terrorism

The Lowdown on Anonymous

Anonymous is an amorphous group of hacktivists with no single leader or power structure. Some call them heroes, others call them criminals. Can they be both?

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week, Josh and Chuck read tons of great articles, some of them really good. Here are the best of the bunch for your enjoyment.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week, Josh and Chuck read tons of great articles, some of them really good. Here are the best of the bunch for your enjoyment.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week, Josh and Chuck read tons of articles and plenty of them are good. Here are the best of the bunch.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

On any given week, Josh and Chuck read a lot of interesting articles. Check out this post with links to the best articles they've read lately.

Hey, folks. Remember back in April when I posted about the famous Lockerbie bombing case from 1988? If not, you should read the link to get a good overview of that case. The long and short if it was that the man that was convicted for bringing down Pan Am flight 103, Abdel Basset Ali al-Megrahi, was being considered for early release because he has cancer. This despite the fact that 256 people died that day in Scotland. Then again, there are some that say that he was innocent in the first place.

I suppose I'm posting this today just because it shocked me that this case is still slugging its way through the court system... Remember when Pan Am Flight 103 was bombed over Lockerbie, Scotland? If not, here's a quick recap - Way back in 1988 Libyan terrorists blew up a plane that left London bound for New York. All 259 people aboard the plane, as well as 11 people on the ground, died in the crash. In 2001, two men were prosecuted for the crime in the Netherlands. On man was acquitted, one was convicted. The appeal for the convicted man just cranked up yesterday in the high court in Edinburgh, more than 20 years after the incident.

This news story from the BBC last week tells us about a new anti-terror ad campaign being waged in England. Posters in Manchester and London urge citizens to be suspicious and report anything they think might be untoward. One such poster has a photo of some chemicals containers in a trash bin, with these words across the bottom - "These chemicals won't be used in a bomb because a neighbour (sic) reported the dumped containers to the Anti-Terrorism Hotline." Another shows a street scene and reads "A bomb won't go off because weeks before, a shopper reported someone for studying the CCTV cameras. Don't rely on others: if you suspect it, report it." You get the idea. This is a bit of a mixed bag. While it's necessary for citizens to be vigilant, this seems slightly skewed toward fear-based tactics and could lead to a certain level of paranoia and hysteria...

CNN.com ran a story yesterday detailing one of the more comical anti-terror laws currently on the books. Was it protecting Americans from shoe bombers or hijackers? Not exactly. It's protecting Americans from people that dress in Colonial-era garb and lead mules alongside a Pennsylvania riverbank. That's right -- some workers at the Hugh Moore Historical Park in Easton, PA are required to submit to a criminal background check as a condition of their employment. What kind of dangerous job do they perform? They pull a boat down a canal with two mules, just like in the good old days. Visitors to the park can take a ride in the boat as part of the tour. The employees who lead the mules at a staggering two mile per hour must apply for biometric Transportation Worker Identification Credentials, just like truckers and longshoremen.