maps

SYSK Selects: How Maps Work

In this week's SYSK Select episode, yes, your brain may have just flash-dried from boredom at the thought of learning about maps, but it turns out they are a lot more than just tools for navigation. Maps are two-dimensional representations of how we imagine our world, with imagine being the operative word since every map in existence is riddled with errors.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Great articles on Comanche warriors, It's A Wonderful Life, Jamaican dancehall and more right here

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week, Josh and Chuck read tons of articles - many of them pretty good. Here are the best of the bunch for you to enjoy.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week, Josh and Chuck read tons of material and a lot of it is really good. Here's the best of the bunch.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week, Josh and Chuck read tons of material and a lot of it is really good. Here's the best of the bunch.

Google Maps and Google Buzz: Using Google for Fun and Profit

Being a Gmail user, I got an alert from Google yesterday letting me know that if I wanted to start my own gravy train against the company for their ill-fated Buzz social media all-in-one platform, I better sever myself before December 6 or else, as a Gmail user, I'll be included in a class action settlement the company's reached.

The Surprisingly Interesting World of Strange Maps

Encoding the location of a person, place or thing in the form of a map emerged as a useful tool of humanity early on. Early maps begin to appear in the historical record in Mesopotamia around 4,400 years back in the form of clay tablets, baked in the sun. One imagines that much earlier maps took the form of temporary line drawings in the sand or dirt, made with a handy stick. Here's where the bison moved to; there's water here, please go get some; there are some people with some nice leather vests beyond this hill. Let's attack them; the spirits inhabit this plain so you'll probably want to shy away from this area here.

Thanks to HowStuffWorks.com head writer Tracy for sending me this cool article on just how remote some areas of Planet Earth are these days. Researchers at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, and the World Bank have drawn up a "map of connectedness." Despite the fact that many of you more adventurous types may have traveled to the far ends of the earth, you probably weren't as far away from a city as you thought. What the researchers set out to determine was how long it would take to travel to a city of at least 50,000 people from any point on earth, by land or sea. They took things like terrain, roads and river networks into consideration to figure this out. The results surprised me - less than 10 percent of the earth's land is more than 48 hours from a city.