Disease

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Interesting articles on the pandemics on the way, skepticism toward Skeptics, classic car crashes and more neat stuff.

Chiggers: The Phantom Menace

Chiggers are tiny little mites capable of making your life miserable. Worse than mosquitoes? Maybe. But they aren't insects - mites are actually part of the arachnid family and behave a little like ticks. Learn all about these nearly invisible pests in today's episode.

How Rabies Works

Rabies may have gotten a lot of attention in the U.S. in the 70s and 80s, but it's still an issue in developing countries. Learn all about this nasty virus in today's episode. And stay away from racoons and bats.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Great articles on witches, bank robbery and lots of other interesting stuff.

What is Collective Hysteria?

Throughout the history of the world, there have been many cases of what is known as collective hysteria - groups of people, usually young women, who all exhibit the same physical symptoms of non-existent conditions. Is it psychosomatic? Is it group think?

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week Chuck and I read tons of articles and a lot of them are really good. Here are the best of the bunch from us to you.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week, Chuck and Josh read tons of articles. Here are the best of the bunch. Enjoy them with our compliments.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Every week, Josh and Chuck read tons of material. Here they share with you the best of the bunch. Enjoy it in good health.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Every week, Chuck and Josh read tons of articles. Here are links to the best of the bunch.

I'd say the thing I liked best about the Wall Street Journal article this post is based on is that it satisfactorily explained why people were keeping the scabs at all. The Journal article concerns the recent arrival of CDC officials at the Virginia Historical Society's exhibit "Bizarre Bits," and the removal of an item on display, a smallpox scab that was discovered in the Society's archives pinned to a letter sent from a man to his father in 1876.