bad science

Research tips from SYSK

People often ask us how we do our research. We're not going to disclose all of our secrets, but we'll give you some tips on how to root out the bad studies from the good ones. Learn all about shady studies and reporting right now!

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Enjoy some pretty neat articles on the death penalty, behavioral psychology and more.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week Josh and Chuck read tons of articles and plenty of them are really good. Here are the best of the bunch.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week, Josh and Chuck read a ton of great articles. Here are the best of the bunch.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week, Josh and Chuck read a ton of great articles. Here are the best of the bunch.

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Every week, Josh and Chuck read tons of material. Here they share with you the best of the bunch. Enjoy it in good health.

There's a very important part of good science, that correlation does not prove causation. To give a crude example, if I'm eating an ice cream cone and a chimp passing by on his way back to the circus goes out of his way to cross the street just to punch me in the stomach, while the same chimp just minds his own business and keeps walking if I'm standing in the same spot but without an ice cream cone, then one can say that ice cream and abdominal pain is correlated. But then one is missing the point.

As is my wont from time to time I like to subtly point out the possible shortcomings of the field of psychology. I've recently found another opportunity, thanks to a recent post by Greg Downey over at Neuroanthropology about a paper in the journal Behavioral and Brain Sciences. A trio of researchers surveyed the literature in the field of behavioral science, the umbrella of psychological studies that also inform other fields like anthropology, philosophy, economics and political science, basically the psychology-led study of what makes us tic.