The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Josh Clark

A $10 Million Nut Heist is a Window into the Shady, Lucrative World of Large-Scale Food Theft On Quartz, Corinne Purtill writes about a new approach to robbing the food supply for profit.

Telling the Truth About the Scum On the Justice Gap, Chris Horrie writes about the British tabloid The Sun and its controversial reporting on a 1989 crowd crush at a soccer game that killed 92 people.

Death Wish Pioneers a New Action Hero: the Angry Middle Aged Vigilante On A/V Club, Tom Breihan writes about the 1974 debut of the violent Charles Bronson film series and how it broke from previous revenge film conventions.

The Necrobiome On The Scientist, Chris Palmer writes about the development of new forensic techniques using microbial activity to study how long a body has been deceased and where it's been.

We Think Scientists Are More Likely to Engage in Necrobestiality (and Other 'Impure' Activities) On BPS Research Digest, Alex Fradera writes about a study that found people think scientists are amoral robots.

A Plan to Hide Humanity from Hostile Aliens On Discover, Eric Betz writes about an idea to use a laser to cloak Earth as it transits in front of the sun.

To Put Harriet Tubman on the $20 Bill Would Be an Insult to Her Legacy On The Guardian, Steven W Thrasher makes the case that adding Tubman to the $20 would undermine her the work she carried out.

The Man In the Steel Cylinder On Passing Strangeness, Paul Drye writes about the discovery in 1945 in Liverpool of a body inside a cylinder that had been there since 1885.

Activists Declare War on Hedge Funds In New York magazine, Michelle Celarier writes about the turning tide against hedge funds, as lousy returns and high fees combine with unsavory political activity by some fund managers.

The Medieval Senses Were Transmitters as Much as Receivers On Aeon, Chris Woolgar writes about the Medieval understanding of the senses, which could not only receive perception of objects, but also moral qualities imbued in them.