Josh's 10 Favorite Cocktails of All Time


7
La Medicina
Courtesy The Sonora Grill

Recipe:

2 oz. Tequila

¾ oz. Fresh squeezed lemon juice

½ oz. Ginger syrup*

½ oz. Honey syrup**

¼ oz. Mescal

Combine the tequila, lemon juice, honey syrup and ginger syrup in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake and then strain into a tumbler with ice. Slowly pour the mezcal over the back of a spoon over the drink so that it floats. Garnish with a lemon peel.

* To make the ginger syrup, combine 1 part ginger juice (you can buy at some stores or if you have a juicer, get to work) to 1 part simple syrup (which is itself 1 part water to 1 part sugar; see the Guadalajara Sour recipe for instructions).

** To make the honey syrup, heat equal parts honey and water in a pot while stirring. Allow to cool and store in the fridge for up to two weeks.

Notes:

La Medicina was created by a bartender at Atlanta restaurant Bocado. It's a play on the classic scotch cocktail the Penicillin, which contrasts smooth blended scotch with a smoky Islay scotch and combines them with lemon, ginger and sweetener. In La Medicina, the scotches are switched out for tequila and mezcal. There are all sorts of mezcal on the market, all made from agave in a similar process to making tequila, but outside of the five regions of Mexico where tequila is legally made (similar to Bourbon only being made within certain counties in Kentucky and champagne being produced only in the Champagne region of France). Mezcal is made somewhat differently from tequila and so it tastes different enough that they are for all intents and purposes two different liquors. You may also be familiar with mezcal as that Mexican liquor that has the worm in it. That's true, but you'll be hard pressed to find a worm in the better mezcals that have hit the American market in the last couple years. In this cocktail, you'll want to use a very smoky mezcal like Sombra to reproduce the impact the Islay scotch has in the Penicillin. Also, this is a great chance to become introduced to making your own syrups, which can be used in all sorts of different drinks, alcoholic and otherwise.