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The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Every week Josh and Chuck read tons of articles and some of them are pretty great. Here are the best of the bunch. See more »

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week Josh and Chuck read tons of articles, plenty of the good. Here are the best of the bunch for your reading enjoyment. See more »

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week, Josh and Chuck read tons of articles, many of which are really good. Here are the best of the bunch. See more »

30 Pieces of Art Made By Prison Inmates

 30 Pieces of Art Made By Prison Inmates

It's not just shivs, drug pipes and tattoo guns -- prisoners take time to make art too. Here are some of the neater pieces. See more »

 Trust in Your Inmates

It was the Quakers who came up with the concept of solitary confinement. As Brooke Shelby Biggs, the author of a fine Mother Jones article on the subject tells it, when the Quakers built their Walnut Street jail in Philadelphia in 1791, it was revolutionary, the first prison designed to not only house inmates as they awaited execution, but possibly to rehabilitate them as well so that they could return to society once more. See more »

 Columbia Study Finds Hungry Judges Likelier to Deny Parole

This sickens me. A study out of Columbia University reviewed more than 1,100 parole hearings for four Israeli prisons presided over by eight different judges over ten months. The reviewer found a bias toward rejecting inmates petitions for parole as sessions got closer to lunch time. In fact, they found a startling trend. See more »

 Arizona Immigration Bill Result of Moneymaking Scheme Among Private Prison Outfits, NPR Finds

Ay ay ay. NPR's Laura Sullivan announced today on Morning Edition that reporters for the organization have spent the last few months following a lead that links private businesses that operate for-profit prisons and the controversial Arizona immigration bill. You'll remember that the law, which was passed by the state this spring and largely dismantled by a federal judge just before it went into effect, requires all cops in Arizona to demand to see the papers of anyone they suspect might be in the U.S. illegally. Those who can't produce them are to be locked up. See more »

 Podcast Goodness: Grow Houses and Prisons

Good morning, folks. Chuck here from the Stuff You Should Know podcast program. Were you expecting someone else? Here in Atlanta, the dog days of summer drag on. You know it's summer when you can get a torrential thunderstorm and it gets even hotter afterward. Yeesh. So this week on the show we talked about two topics that you could say are related -- marijuana grow houses and prison. If you take part in the first, you may find yourself in the second. Tuesday's show on grow houses was pretty interesting. See more »

 5 Horrific Psychological Experiments - #2: Stanford Prison Experiment

There's a very dark core located somewhere deep within each of us. For, say, Henry Lee Lucas, it was much closer to the surface. For Shirley Temple, perhaps a little more repressed (although there was the one unpleasant incident no one talks about with the drifter). This dark core has a tendency to be nurtured and brought to the surface by the dark cores of other people. It's the mob mentality; it's groupthink at its worst. It's the reason soccer riots happen (that's right, I said soccer). It's the reason the Salem Witchcraft Trials happened. And the tacit understanding that it lies in each of us is the reason the Germany as a nation wasn't dismantled and its entire population separated and shipped to other nations for deprogramming as a stipulation of the Marshall Plan. See more »

 Manson Family Wants a Taste of Freedom

This article from CNN.com today focuses on the current state of the "Manson Family" -- the group of murdering murderers famous for slaying seven people in California in August, 1969. We all know that the family's patriarch was one Charles Manson, once a feared cult leader, now just an old dude in prison with a fading swastika on his forehead. It seems that a recent prison photo of Charlie at 75 years old has sparked renewed interest in the case. The article gives updates on the current state of the other imprisoned family members. Susan Atkins is terminally ill with brain cancer, "Tex" Watson is a minister, Patricia Krenwinkel helps in a prison program to train puppies as service dogs and Leslie Van Houten is a model inmate in the same prison as Krenwinkel. They are all in their 60s, except for Van Houten, who is 59. See more »