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The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Great articles on the Titanic wreck site, Barrett Brown, impossible spacecraft engines, true crime and more stuff. See more »

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Articles on Big Sugar, internet sleuths, Philip Seymour Hoffman, the Atlanta Child Murders and more stuff. See more »

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Great articles on the surveillance, life in prison and lots more stuff. See more »

How The Great Train Robbery Worked

 How The Great Train Robbery Worked

In 1963, 15 men got together in England to pull off one of the most daring heists in history. The Great Train Robbery was the crime of the century, capturing the public's attention and leaving them torn on who to root for - the cops or the robbers. Learn all about England's greatest heist in today's episode. See more »

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Every week Josh and Chuck read tons of articles and some of them are pretty great. Here are the best of the bunch. See more »

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week Josh and Chuck read tons of articles, plenty of the good. Here are the best of the bunch for your reading enjoyment. See more »

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week, Josh and Chuck read tons of articles, many of which are really good. Here are the best of the bunch. See more »

 Trust in Your Inmates

It was the Quakers who came up with the concept of solitary confinement. As Brooke Shelby Biggs, the author of a fine Mother Jones article on the subject tells it, when the Quakers built their Walnut Street jail in Philadelphia in 1791, it was revolutionary, the first prison designed to not only house inmates as they awaited execution, but possibly to rehabilitate them as well so that they could return to society once more. See more »

 Columbia Study Finds Hungry Judges Likelier to Deny Parole

This sickens me. A study out of Columbia University reviewed more than 1,100 parole hearings for four Israeli prisons presided over by eight different judges over ten months. The reviewer found a bias toward rejecting inmates petitions for parole as sessions got closer to lunch time. In fact, they found a startling trend. See more »

 Arizona Immigration Bill Result of Moneymaking Scheme Among Private Prison Outfits, NPR Finds

Ay ay ay. NPR's Laura Sullivan announced today on Morning Edition that reporters for the organization have spent the last few months following a lead that links private businesses that operate for-profit prisons and the controversial Arizona immigration bill. You'll remember that the law, which was passed by the state this spring and largely dismantled by a federal judge just before it went into effect, requires all cops in Arizona to demand to see the papers of anyone they suspect might be in the U.S. illegally. Those who can't produce them are to be locked up. See more »