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The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week, Josh and Chuck read tons of articles and plenty of them are good. Here are the best of the bunch. See more »

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week Josh and Chuck read tons of articles. Many are terrible, but some are great. Here are the best of the bunch for your enjoyment. See more »

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Each week, Josh and Chuck read a ton of great articles. Here are the best of the bunch. See more »

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Every week, Chuck and Josh read tons of articles. Here are links to the best of the bunch. See more »

 LSD, Jell-O, Mouse Pain and Obama's Pardonless Presidency: More Interesting Stuff I've Learned Recently

Here's more interesting stuff I've picked up in the last fortnight or so: 1) A group of Dutch and Canadian researchers have developed the cutest, most heartbreaking pain scale issued by science thus far. In a paper in the journal Nature Methods, the researchers describe a mouse pain scale they devised the hard way, by subjecting mice to painful stimuli and videotaping the mice's reaction to the pain. As the researchers predicted, mice, like humans, have facial expressions that are generally uniform that the researchers used to code and grade the pain the mice endured. So cheek bulge falls into severe pain, while eye squeeze falls into moderate, adorable pain. Guh. The researchers devised the scale to help guide other researchers as they continue to subject mice to Mengele-esque experimentation. See more »

 Being Stabbed in the Gut Not So Bad When You're A Yogi, Study Finds

Thanks to Xeno over at Xenophilia for posting about a recent study out of University of Manchester (Go, Fighting Happy Mondays!) that discovered meditating can lead to a decrease in the emotional experience of pain. We talked about pain in the recent SYSK podcasts about people who can feel no pain and people who can feel others' pain. There are two types of pain, emotional pain and physical pain, also called nociception. These two types of pain are entirely separate. We've got two different systems for handling physical and emotional pain, although the two can work in conjunction. See more »

 What We've All Been Waiting For: the Guy who Started the Global Financial Meltdown

There was this one aspect of the global financial crisis that has thus far carried everyone away from storming buildings on Wall Street or burning investment bankers in effigy or in reality. That one thing was that, despite all the greed on both sides of the housing bubble, it was ultimately no one's fault. As the New York Times has been reporting since last Friday, that's no longer the case. The global financial meltdown that has left millions out of work, dried up the retirement savings of other millions and bankrupted businesses and governments around the planet was, indeed, someone's fault. That someone is a hedge fund manager named John Paulson. See more »

 On the Coinciding of Norman Borlaug and Pain-Free Animals

I've come to believe that there's some sort of connective tissue between events and living things that lies just beyond sensible perception. Sometimes a glimpse is afforded for only an astoundingly clear moment and our understanding of what's just been realized fades into gauze and then nothingness, despite how hard we may grasp at it to maintain our hold. At other times it remains in plain sight, but our understanding of what we're looking at simply falters. Kind of like how the first person to behold a dead fish must have puzzled over it. There it is, smelly and shiny and not moving, but what the heck is it? Eventually, we came up with a word for it -- fish -- and with a name, it became mundane. A dead fish, now, is a dead fish, nothing more. See more »

 Shot in the Gut? Pretending You're Rich Will Ease the Pain

All you wanted was a gallon of milk, but noooo, you had to end up an innocent victim in an armed robbery. The door swings to and fro on its hinges in a lessening pendulum after your assailant has made his way off into the night, ski mask still on his head, sawed-off shotgun still in hand. You noted he was just under six feet tall -- huh, those markers along the door frames really do work. Everything is still, you suspect the convenience store clerk is dead. All you hear is the buzzing of the gaudy fluorescent lights overhead. See more »