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 How Polar Bears Work

Polar bears are more than just lovable creatures that roam the ice in search of food. They're one of the most fascinating animals on planet Earth. Sadly, as ice shrinks, so does their habitat. Learn all about these huggable beasts in today's episode. See more »

How Ice Ages Work

 How Ice Ages Work

Believe it or not, we live in an ice age. The polar glaciers give it away. Those glaciers used to come clear down to New York. We now know the traces they left are everywhere if you know what to look for; it just took some Swiss peasants to figure it out. See more »

Stuff You Should Know: Internet Roundup: Indonesia's Blowin' Up Boats & Simulating Pompeii

 Stuff You Should Know: Internet Roundup: Indonesia's Blowin' Up Boats & Simulating Pompeii

Indonesia is dealing with poaching fishing boats in a unique way: it's blowing them up. Plus, a computer animation that simulates what Pompeii would have been like on the fateful day Mount Vesuvius erupted. See more »

All we know about Zika so far...

 All we know about Zika so far...

Zika is all over the news these days, yet in America, people don't seem to be too concerned just yet. Some say it's a case of the media crying wolf. Others say it's because the risk factors for zika are limited. Learn all about the latest virus to take center stage in today's episode. See more »

How Cerebral Palsy Works

 How Cerebral Palsy Works

Cerebral palsy isn’t a disease, but an umbrella term for conditions arising from brain damage suffered in the womb or shortly after birth. The factors involved are so divergent no two cases of CP are alike, making it – and people who have CP – fascinating. See more »

Stuff You Should Know: Internet Roundup: China's Housing Bubble & The Man in the Steel Cylinder

 Stuff You Should Know: Internet Roundup: China's Housing Bubble & The Man in the Steel Cylinder

China is building housing at a far faster pace than their population can fill it, leaving many eerie ghost cities in its wake. Plus, the bizarre story of a man encased in a steel cylinder for decades. See more »

What's the deal with Stradivarius violins?

 What's the deal with Stradivarius violins?

The Strad violin is noted for its tonal qualities and superior craftsmanship. And for its price tag. There are many theories why the Strad sounds so great, from the wood to the lacquer, to the simple fact that Antonio Stradivari was really good at what he did. Rosin up your bow and take a listen. See more »

Alexander Hamilton: Most Influential American?

 Alexander Hamilton: Most Influential American?

Alexander Hamilton, the 'ten dollar founding father,' is more than the toast of Broadway. In fact, he just may be the most influential American in history. A brash genius, Hamilton wasn't much of a politician. He was all about policy. Learn all about Hamilton in today's episode. See more »

Stuff You Should Know: Internet Roundup: Cow Urine in High Demand & A Superhero Wake

 Stuff You Should Know: Internet Roundup: Cow Urine in High Demand & A Superhero Wake

In India, cow urine is a hot commodity for uses as diverse as folk medicine and floor cleaners. Plus, a strange funeral wake involving a Green Lantern costume. See more »

Do Animals Have Natural Rights?

 Do Animals Have Natural Rights?

Animals have had legal protection from unnecessary harm since the 19th century. Yet what harm is necessary is open to interpretation and animals continue to suffer and die for science and commerce. Should they have the right to freedom from humans? See more »

How Animal Testing Works

 How Animal Testing Works

The use of animals for commercial and scientific testing is a quietly controversial topic. That we humans have advanced as a species because we use animals as literal and figurative guinea pigs is undeniable. But do we have the right to do that? See more »

How the Negro Leagues Worked

 How the Negro Leagues Worked

A decade before the U.S. officially segregated in 1896, baseball banned black players. A decade before the US integrated, baseball broke the color barrier. Between, the Negro Leagues produced some of the finest players to ever take the field. See more »

How Food Tasters Work

 How Food Tasters Work

Some people might think that tasting food for a living is the best job in the whole wide world. But think again! The reality is, it can be a tedious, grueling job that destroys your very love of food. See more »

Stuff You Should Know: Internet Roundup: Ongoing Human Evolution & Unauthorized Merit Badges

 Stuff You Should Know: Internet Roundup: Ongoing Human Evolution & Unauthorized Merit Badges

A self-proclaimed Harvard 'genoeconomist' has discovered evidence of evolution in modern humans - and for some reason it favors the slightly less educated. Plus, some awesome unauthorized scout merit badges. See more »

This Custom of Customs

 This Custom of Customs

Customs may be a pain when you're traveling, but it's a necessary instrument the government uses to regulate trade. Your passport please? See more »

Jellyfish: Even Cooler than Octopi?

 Jellyfish: Even Cooler than Octopi?

Jellyfish are among the most adaptable, competitive organisms on the planet. They can grow back into their juvenile stage when resources are scarce, reproduce in massive groups and kill an adult human, among lots of other neat stuff. Learn all about em! See more »

Stuff You Should Know: Internet Roundup: DNA Clothing & An Unearthed Coffin

 Stuff You Should Know: Internet Roundup: DNA Clothing & An Unearthed Coffin

A designer plans a fashion collection using human skin grown from another designer's DNA. Plus, a child's coffin from 150 years ago is unearthed in San Francisco, and reburied. See more »

The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

 The Best Stuff We've Read This Week

Why Do We Love Bad Singing?Breunig vs American Family Insurance CompanyBlue-Blocking Sunglasses May Help Treat Bipolar Disorder, Help Promote SleepThe Mystery Behind a Kazakh Town's Sleeping SicknessHollywood Has Ruined Method ActingHow to ... See more »

The Delightful History of Steam Technology

 The Delightful History of Steam Technology

One of the coolest things humans have ever figured out is how to use steam as power. It made the Industrial Revolution possible and even today, 88% of America's electricity comes from steam turbines. See more »

How Woolly Mammoths Worked

 How Woolly Mammoths Worked

It was only 11,000 years ago that the last true woolly mammoths died out, close enough to the modern age that humans lived alongside them. But were humans the cause of mammoths’ sudden extinction or was climate change to blame? See more »